• Grabung im Ried West
    Grabung im Ried West
  • Grabung im Ried West
    Grabung im Ried West
Zeitleiste_neu Altsteinzeit Mittelsteinzeit Jungsteinzeit Bronzezeit Urnenfelder Kultur Hallstattzeit Latene Zeit Roemer und Germanen Mittelalter

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Hallstatt Culture

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Hallstatt Culture

800 - 500 B.C.

No epoch is as closely connected with the name Beilngries as the Hallstatt-culture. This statement goes back to extensive excavation activities of Dr. Theodor Thenn, who excavated the largest number of former Hallstatt grave mounds in Bavaria at the turn of the 19th century. Professor Walter Torbrügge assumed that there were about 1000 burials in the Beilngries basin.

In the mappings of Torbrügge, the aforementioned grave groups in the “Altmühltal” (valley surrounding the river Altmühl), at the end of the “Sulztal” (valley surrounding the river Sulz) and especially in the Ottmaringer (village) valley. Depicted are all conceivable forms of grave structures, especially the so-called stone tombs. In these valleys body graves, which were often surrounded by several cremation graves, as it was common in the Urn Field Culture, were found. The cemeteries were used in both stages of the Hallstatt culture.

Grave plan: “Im Grund”, LfD
Grave plan: “Im Ried Ost”, LfD

In the graves, the social levels of the population are clearly reflected by the value and number of the added grave goods. Most notable are the graves of rich lords who were buried with horses and wagons. The fittings of the bronze horse harness and those of the iron carriages have been preserved. Special attention was attracted by the addition of iron andirons with bullhorn decoration and a dozen meat skewers. Women had been given plenty of bronze jewelry such as fibulas, bracelets, anklets and chokers as grave goods. The graves of men were equipped with iron weapons. In addition, there are interesting stylized representations of riders and walking birds, put onto the shoulder of vessels. There was also an extraordinary animal-shaped „Rhyton“, which was a typical vessel of that time for taking an intoxicating drink. The animal depicted isn’t clearly identifiable, but it is likely to be a bull.

Little is known of associated settlements so far as hardly anything has been excavated or explored. Typical for the Hallstatt period are fortified hill settlements, the so-called section ramparts for example near Kipfenberg (market town) at the Michelsberg (a hill near Kipfenberg) and manors in the bottom of the valley (for example near the ICE route between Enkering and Kinding). Manors are also expected to be found in Beilngries. One may be curious about the role of trade and the iron industry in the landscape around central Beilngries.


 

 

Spindle whorl with peripheral finger-dents from the “Jurahoch” area west of Oberndorf (village)
Bronze geometrically decorated bow fibula