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Bronze Age

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Older Early Bronze Age

Pottery of the older Early Bronze Age from the settlement Beilngries "Im Oehl III" (according to Stoll - Tucker)
Pottery of the older Early Bronze Age from the settlement Beilngries "Im Oehl III" (according to Stoll - Tucker)
Arrowhead of the older Early Bronze Age from the settlement Beilngries "Im Oehl III" (according to Stoll - Tucker)
Arrowhead of the older Early Bronze Age from the settlement Beilngries "Im Oehl III" (according to Stoll - Tucker)

2 200 - 1 900 B.C.

Little is known about the older Early Bronze Age. Of this period of time bronze goods have barely been found. Pottery from the settlements seems to have evolved from the later stage of the Bell Beaker Culture. Finds from Beilngries (town) - especially those from the area of "Im Oehl III" and those from the excavations at the settlements near the RMD-Kanal (Rhine-Main-Danube–Canal) - are of great importance in our area. Graves from this time, however, are still largely unknown.

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Younger Early Bronze Age

Handle cup with lugs from a presumably destroyed grave. Beilngries, Beilngries, Western Ring Road 1961
Antler fork with drilling, workpiece for horse trench, presumably Early Bronze Age

1 900 - 1 600 B.C.

The peasant settlers living in this period of time mainly chose the lower, sun-facing slopes as their dwelling places. In addition to numerous indices to these settlements in Beilngries (town) there are also observations of graves. One of them was found at the place "Bei der Kapelle" (“At the Chaple”) near Kirchanhausen. It is reported that one of the skeletons was found as a crouched inhumation, a funeral style with "tucked up" legs, which has been common since the Neolithic period . Max Brand found pottery potsherds of vessels from a presumably devastated grave of the Early Bronze Age at “Ringstraße” in 1961.

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Middle Bronze Age "Tumulus Bronze Age"

1 600 - 1 250 B.C.

By the end of the 18th century Dr. Franz Mayer, a native of Beilngries (town) and a student of Prof. Ignatz Pickel, had already dug up burial mounds of the Middle Bronze Age in the woods around Beilngries.
Some bronze finds from the bottom of the valley around "Im Grund Ost" or "Bühlkirchen" (excavation sites) are typical grave goods from women's and men's graves. At this time as well, the associated settlements ran from the gentle hilly slopes down to the flood plain.


Cup with smoothed surface
Bronze dagger with four rivets
Bracelet from the Bronze Age burial mound field Biberbach-Kühknock, burial mound 1, photo: archaeological state collection Munich, S. Friedrich
Needle with a cylindrical head from the Middle Bronze Age
Bronze disc head needle. Round stick with straight shaft. Two decorative zones in the upper shaft area with engraved transverse grooves, length 38.5cm, and multi-ribbed bronze bracelet. Probably grave goods from the late hill grave Bronze Age, 14th century B.C.
Multi-ribbed bronze bracelet with 5 longitudinal ribs and stud ends. Largest diameter 6 cm.

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End of the Middle Bronze Age

around 1300 B.C.

The body grave of a woman from the “Ottmaringer Tal” (valley) equipped with arm rings, a robe needle and bronze earrings is of particular interest. It dates back to the time of the transition from the Middle Bronze Age to the Urn Field Time.

Ornate bracelets and an oversized cloak pin
Body grave
Detail of the head with earrings